Friendship certificate

Vehicles made in USA, Great Britain and Canada

Jeep

count of vehicles owned by club members: 36

This type of vehicle is the most abundant in number in our club. The numbers of vehicles are constantly changing, but we will try to keep them updated.

Jeep Willys MA

Jeep Willys MA

count of vehicles owned by club members: 1

The Willys-Overland company developed its Quad in 1940 and the result was an order for 1,500 pieces of the improved MA model in 1941. Further 50 pieces were reportedly manufactured prior the MB model was standardized. Many of the MAs were sent to Russia as loan and lease.

TTD
the same as Willys MB and Ford GPW, only the gearshift is below the steering wheel
length:3378 mm
width:1575 mm
height:1778 mm, resp. 1295 mm
weight:980 kg

Jeep Willys MB, Ford GPW

count of vehicles owned by club members: 23

Jeep Willys MB, Ford GPW

After testing the first quarter-ton vehicles Bantam, Ford and Willys, the latter firm was selected for serial production subject to making certain changes. The production began in late 1941. In early 1942, Ford became co-producer. The production was finished in August 1945. Serial numbers of the Willys company show 359,851 pieces and Ford shows 277,878 pieces.

Note: They differ in minor details. For example, GPW has a cross U-beam under the cooler (MB has a tubular girder).

TTD
engine:four-cylinder, gasoline with side valves
transmission:3 gears forward, 1 reverse + additional two-gear gearbox with a clutch for disconnecting the front-wheel drive
breaks:hydraulic
electronic system:6V
axles:rigid with leaf springs
gears:6,00 – 16
length:3353 mm
width:1575 mm
height:1753 mm
volume of fuel:57 litres
weight:1111 kg
max. speed:105 km/hour
average fuel consumption:13,2 l/100 km

Jeep Willys MC – M38

count of vehicles owned by club members: 4

Jeep Willys MC – M38

The waterproof militarized version of the CJ3A Universal Jeep model with 24-Volt electrical system. More than 60,000 pieces were produced. The production ran between 1950 and 1952/53. It was also produced by Ford in Canada).

TTD
engine:four-cylinder
transmission:rear or all wheels driven by a three-speed gearbox and an additional two-gear gearbox
breaks:hydraulic
electronic system:24V
axles:rigid with leaf springs
gears:7,00 – 16
length:3378 mm
width:1575 mm
height:1880, or 1397 mm
weight:1191 kg

Jeep M 606 – M38A1

count of vehicles owned by club members: 1

In 1952, the Willys-Overland company introduced a much modified military Jeep that was standardized by the armed forces as M38A1. About two years later, a civil CJ5 variant followed, from which the following types originated later.

TTD
engine:four-cylinder
transmission:3 gears forward, 1 reverse + additional two-gear gearbox with disconnecting the front-wheel drive
breaks:hydraulic
electronic system:24V
axles:rigid with half-elliptical leaf springs
gears:7,00 – 16
length:3531 mm
width:1549 mm
height:1880 mm
volume of fuel:64 litres
weight:1243 kg

Ford MUTT – M151

count of vehicles owned by club members: 7

Ford Mutt M151 A2 Ford Mutt M151 A1

Ford MUTT M151 was designed by Ford in the 1950s to replace Jeep M38 and M38A1. The serial production from 1960. Body by Fruehauf company. The M151A1 (1964) a M151A2 (1970) models were improved versions. "MUTT" is an abbreviation of Military Utility Tactical Truck.

note: Note the basic differences between the A1 and A2 variants

  1. The A1 variant has not moulded mudguard
  2. The A1 variant has a split windshield
  3. The A1 variant has cat eyes on the front grille (the same as jeep Willys or GPV)
TTD
engine:four-cylinder
transmission:a four-speed gearbox and an additional one-gear gearbox, the rear or all wheels driven
breaks:hydraulic
electronic system:24V
axles:independent suspension with coil springs
gears:7,00 – 16
length:3378 mm
width:1626 mm
height:1803, or 1321 mm
weight:1066 kg

Harley Davidson

count of vehicles owned by club members: 4

Harley-Davidson WLA

The motorbike was used for the service of police liaison, to control convoys…

WLA was one of the most numerous motorbikes of the World War II. The American troops alone used much more than 60,000 pieces.

The pieces produced in 1942-1945 had their headlights low, the horn above it and the air filter was angular in shape (the WLCs that were made ​​for Canada – after 1943). The production was finished in early 1950s.

TTD
engine:V-twin cylinder with side valves
transmission:manual three-gear gearbox, secondary chain transmission
breaks:mechanical
electronic system:6V
axles:independent suspension with coil springs
gears:4,00 – 18
length:2235 mm
width:940 mm
height:1016 mm, 1549 mm with a protective shield
volume of fuel:13 l
weight:249 kg

M3 Half-track

count of vehicles owned by club members: 2

M3 Half-track

M3 Half-track was a half-track armoured carrier of the U.S. Army during the WW2. Popular with American troops as well as Universal Carrier with British troops. However, it was a more multifunctional carrier because it could carry 10 men and its top speed was around 72 km/h with a range of around 320 km. It was also used as an interceptor tank, as anti-aircraft or a mortar carrier mortar or an artillery tractor.

Its production ran from 1940 to 1945 at three manufacturers - Autocar Company, Diamond T Motor Company and White Company. About 4,000 vehicles of the basic M3 variant were produced. Most of the artillery or anti-aircraft M3 variants were converted back to the basic transport M3A1 variant in the second half of the war.

TTD
engine:Gasoline White 160AX 110kW (147PS)
length:6180 mm
width:2220 mm
height:2260 mm
weight:8000 – 10000 kg
max. speed:72 km/h
range:cca 320 mk
armouring:6 – 12 mm
weaponry:depending on the variant
crew:3 + 10

M 29 C - Weasel

count of vehicles owned by club members: 1

M 29 C - Weasel

MM 29C Weasel was the first vehicle that landed on the Omaha beach in Normandy on 6 June 1944 30 minutes after the start of the invasion.

The history of the Studebaker M 29 Weasel vehicle began in 1942 when the Allied command decided to carry out a major airborne operation in Norway called "Plough" (i.e. "farming equipment" but also "to force a way through, to go violently through"). The aim was to destroy a heavy water plant and thus to prevent the Nazi Germany in the production of atomic bombs. Thus, the operation was included in the Manhattan Project, under which the U.S. developed the atomic bomb. Both also have a maximum degree of confidentiality as the highest priority. About 2,000 to 4,000 men, equipped with special snow vehicles, were to take part in the operation.

The M26 Weasel vehicle had been designed for the Plough operation by Studebaker in six months. At the same time in Hale in Colorado and in Canada, the training of the 1st Canadian and American Special Services Group, later known as the "Black Devil’s Brigade" was launched. Since mid-1942, the training was conducted with vehicles. At the end of 1943, the final decision on the "Overlord" Operation – the Normandy invasion – was made. Therefore, all other operations, including the "Plough" operation, were terminated immediately. The production of M 29 Weasel still continued, even though never in mass pace. Since 1943 in the M 29C version. The vehicle was very popular with soldiers. It also served in Korea and the French army after the war and was called "Le Crabee".

The displayed vehicle is of the M 29C type; it was manufactured at the end of the war and its name is dedicated to the memory of heroes from the U.S. 101st Airborne Division.

TTD
A lightweight airborne and reconnaissance vehicle and, after minor modifications, floating as well. Its size, weight and high clearness allow transport by air as well as amphibious operations.
engine:water-cooled gasoline 6-cylinder Studebaker 6-170 Champion, 65hp/3600rpm
transmission:three-speed gearbox + additional 2-speed, reduced
driving:braking by rear half-axles, mechanical wet brakes
length:320,04 cm
width:167,64 cm
height:180,34 cm
weight:1800 kg
curb weight:2548 kg
max. speed:58 km/h
clearance height:27,94 cm
volume of fuel:132 l (35 gallon)
range:cca 280 km
crew:4

M8 Greyhound

count of vehicles owned by club members: 1

M8 Greyhound

M8 Greyhound was a wheeled armoured carrier of the U.S. Army during the WW2. Due to its speed and low silhouette it was used primarily for reconnaissance operations. The production ran between 1943 and 1945 at Ford Motor Company. 8,630 pieces were produced.

TTD
length:500 cm
width:254 cm
height:264 cm
weight:7800 kg
armouring:do 19 mm
weaponry:37mm cannon M6, 0,30" coaxial machine gun Browning a rotary 0,50" machine gun Bowning M2, gasoline engine Hercules JXD 82kW (110PS)
max. speed:90 km/h
range:cca 640 km
crew:4

Ford Canada

count of vehicles owned by club members: 1

Ford Canada F60S

Ford Canada F60S, produced between 1941 and 1945. The vehicle in the photo was produced in 1944. It is a representative of CMP (Canadian Military Pattern) vehicles for the Canadian Army.

TTD
engine:water-cooled eight-cylinder engine V, 95 hp, 4000 cm3
transmission:4-speed + reductive 2-speed
length:5200 mm
width:2250 mm
height:2600 mm
weight:4150 kg
capacity:3000 kg
gears:11 - 20
traction:4x4
max. speed:85 km/h

GMC CCKW 353 A2

count of vehicles owned by club members: 3

GMC CCKW 353 A2

GMC CCKW 353 A2 was a medium-sized all-terrain truck of the U.S. Army during the WW2. The production ran between 1941 and 1945. About 56.200 CCKW GMC 352/3 vehicles were manufactured in various versions.

TTD
engine:Gasoline GMC 270 (91PS)
length:6930 mm
width:2235 mm
height:2200 mm
weight:5400 kg
traction:6x6
max. speed:72 km/h
range:cca 400 km
crew:2

Dodge

count of vehicles owned by club members: 14

Dodge WC 21

count of vehicles owned by club members: 1

Dodge WC 22

count of vehicles owned by club members: 1

Final production of the half-ton Dodge 4×4 model, supplied in 1942.

  1. WC 21 – pick – up – weapons carrier
  2. WC 22 – the same without a winch
TTD
the same as WC 51 and WC 52 with these differencies:
gears:7,5 - 16
length:4597 mm
width:1905 mm
height:2235 mm
weight:2105 kg
volume of fuel:95 l

Dodge WC 51 a WC 52

count of vehicles owned by club members: 6 (WC 51), 2 (WC 52)

Dodge WC 51 Dodge WC 52

The vehicle was introduced in 1942 as a replacement of half-ton T 214 series models from 1940 to 1941. Large quantities (more than 250,000 pieces) were produced until 1945.

WC 51 (weapons carrier without a winch) was the most numerous model – about half of the total quantity.

TTD
engine:6-cylinder ignition (T 214 with side valves)
transmission:4 gears forward, 1 reverse + additional one-gear gearbox with disconnecting the front-wheel drive
breaks:hydraulic
electronic system:6V (1945 models – 12V)
axles:half-elliptical leaf springs
length:4470 mm
width:2108 mm
height:2159 mm
weight:3334 kg
volume of fuel:114 l
gears:9,00 - 16

Dodge WC 54 (known also as sanita)

count of vehicles owned by club members: 1

About 26,000 pieces were produced between 1942 and 1944. At the rear, there was space for 4 stretchers or 7 seats for patients. They were used by the U.S. Army medical units and the Allies.

TTD
the same as WC 51 and WC 52 with these differencies:
length:4928 mm
width:1981 mm
height:2286 mm
weight:2685 kg

Dodge WC 57

count of vehicles owned by club members: 1

Dodge WC 57

The vehicle is known as the Dodge command car. The WC 56 model was similar, but without a winch. The WC 58 model was a liaison version. More than 27,000 pieces of these 3 versions were produced from April 1942 to 1944.

TTD
the same as WC 51 and WC 52 with these differencies:
length:4470 mm
width:2007 mm
height:2057 mm
weight:2574 kg

Dodge M 37 (so-called Korea)

count of vehicles owned by club members: 1

Dodge M 43

count of vehicles owned by club members: 1

The T 245 series was introduced in 1950; its production continued until 1954 and it was renewed (as T 245A) between 1957 and 1968). The total number of 110,000 pieces were produced. In addition, more than 4,500 pieces were produced in Canada (the T 249 series).

The M 37 model was the most common; the M 43 ambulance model on a longer chassis followed.

TTD
the same as WC 51 and WC 52 with these differencies:
electronic system:24V
length:4801 mm
width:1854 mm
height:2261 mm
volume of fuel:91 l
2012 © Military Car Club, Plzeň. Vyrobilo studio WEB&DTP. Aktualizace 28. 4. 2015